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20130228
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
it but i don't miss it. >> she's hearty though. let's go back to erin in kansas city, missouri. this storm is big and powerful and knocked your microphone. >> reporter: it is very windy. we expect gusts up to 30 miles an hour today. so the governors of kansas and missouri are urging people to stay off the roads and take precautions because they want to make sure people know that this storm will be more dangerous than the storm they had here just last week, john. >> erin, it does look -- it looks nasty out there. she's been here a week and we sent her to two blizzards in the plains states. thank you, erin. >> who would have thought back to back. >>> four minutes past the hour. we're following a developing story four. it is horror in a hot air touri bird's-eye view of the scene, it plummeted to the ground. what do you know? >> reporter: this is just an awful incident that's not going to bode well for egypt's already ailing tourism industry and the hot air balloon industry. first and foremost, you have to think about the families of the 20 victims. 20 people killed according to this hot air b
've got this extreme weather for you. erin, you've been there when the snow first started to fall and when it stopped and now comes the cleanup. >> reporter: well, and right now, today, it's a lot colder here this morning than it was yesterday. it's about 14 degrees. we hope our fingers don't freeze off. if you can see behind me, they're already starting to dig out. we've got that. now the national guard is patroling for stranded motorists throughout the state. wichita, where we are now, got a near record snowfall, 14.2". their record is 15.2". so, most of the states, schools are still closed today. although the airports are now open, starting to dig out there, too. believe it or not, what they're calling the blizzard of oz here in kansas is a welcomed development for a lot of residents. i spoke to one yesterday, kristen woodburn. here she is. >> it snows so infrequently here now, we've been in a really bad drought for several years. really, really hot temperatures in the summer and just no moisture. so, we're thrilled to see snow, ice, whatever moisture we can get. >> reporter: this is th
the circumstances of his death. >> you know, erin mclaughlin joins us from london. what does this discovery of richard iii mean? >> hi, christine. historians really think this is an opportunity to rewrite history. these are the culmination of months of detailed analysis, including dna testing, radio carbon testing, environmental sampling, and not only tell us beyond any sort of reasonable doubt that this was, in fact, richard iii, but they begin to paint a picture as to who this man was. he was 32 years old when he died. he was suffered from severe scoliosis or curvature of the spine, died at the battle of bosworth due to blunt trauma at the back of his head. his naked body strewn to a horse, brought to a grave and hastily dug and thrown in there without a shroud or coffin. we hope this will paint a different picture of richard iii, one that challenges shakespeare's portrayal of a i'll ha vile and evil monster. >> you hear of this story at the tower of london, how he killed his nephews, the little boys. and this was a medieval time when these were the things that dukes and kings did to each
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)